Fridays Officially Become New Music Release Day

The days of going out on Tuesday to buy your favorite artists’ new album are officially going to be history.

Earlier this week, it was reported by Music Week that the official music release date would be changed from Tuesday to Friday which would become a universal release date for new music.

International Federation of Phonographic Industry head Frances Moore, had more than confirmed the news during the interview with the music website, even promising that a formal announcement would be made soon.

Turns out, that “really soon” was today.

The back-and-forth for the change has been going on since Australia made their official music release date Friday back in August. Now, every other country including music industry powerhouses like the United States and the United Kingdom have made it official.

The IFPI, which represents labels worldwide conducted a study before the decision was formally made with Moore saying the following about the results found.

“Music fans live in the digital world of today. Their love for new music doesn’t recognize national borders. They want music when it’s available in their country. An aligned global release day puts an end to the frustration of not being able to access releases in their country when the music is available in another country.”

While Moore and the vast majority of record labels and people behind the scenes were all for the change in release date, not all were happy with the decision, especially those in the independent field of the music industry.

In Music Week’s article, they interviewed Beggars Group chairman Martin Mills who had a lot to say on the matter especially giving his opinion that it would make it more difficult for independent artists to reach the same success like those who have backing from major record labels.

“I fear this move will also lead to a market in which the mainstream dominates, and the niche, which can be tomorrow’s mainstream, is further marginalized. I fear it will further cement the dominance of the few – and that is exactly what it is intended to do,” Mills was quoted as saying.
But Mills isn’t alone is not liking the shift.

Mills is not alone in his dislike of the new policy.

Rich Bengleoff, the head of the American Association of Independent Music released a statement which he sees the potential of a global release date, but the draw backs when it comes to the business aspect of the industry.

“A2IM supports the concept of a global release date but, for a variety of business reasons as spelled out in out previous comments, there are a number of business hurdles that make Fridays less optimal for the United States marketplace, and independents in particular. That said, as part of the worldwide music community, A2IM will endeavor to make the transaction as smooth as possible for our members and our commerce partners and a success for our artists’ fans.”

The transition is scheduled to begin this Summer.