Former Lostprophets Members Speak About Tarnished Band Name

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Last week, we uncovered that the remaining members of Lostprophets had joined Thursday’s Geoff Rickly to create a new band named No Devotion.

In the wake of the Ian Watkins chronicles where he plead guilty to 13 charges including attempted rape and sexual assault of a child under the age of 13, the four remaining members of the Welsh band were left with a tarnished band name.

In turn, they announced back in October that the band were splitting up in the midst of Watkins’ trial.

In an interview with The Guardian, it was revealed how much Watkins’ 29 year sentencing affected the band. It was so bad that guitarist Lee Gaze revealed he can’t listen to anything the band had put out.

“I can’t [listen]. It’s tainted, because he was the voice of the band, and it was his lyrics.”

The band’s former bassist, Stuart Richardson was so affected by the turn of events that he smashed a platinum disc that was given to each member in celebration of 2006’s Liberation Transmission platinum status.

“I don’t know how his badness can’t cancel out our music,” Richardson began. “We had platinum records in our houses, awards…I smashed Liberation Transmission the other day. The rest are in the garage and they’ll probably never come out again.”

But not all things are bad. In order to distance themselves from the damaged Lostprophets name, No Devotion which not only features Gaze and Richardson, but also Jamie Oliver, Luke Johnson and Mike Lewis, is set to release their debut album, Stay later this month. The newly formed band had released their first single last week, the same day they revealed the creation of the group.

Frances Bean Cobain Speaks Out About Lana Del Rey “Death” Quote

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Lana Del Rey might have been backtracking a statement that she made in an interview a few weeks ago, but someone else has spoken out against her romanticized version of death; Frances Bean Cobain.

In her interview with The Guardian, you know the one where she said she wished she was “already dead,” she reportedly was intrigued by the glamour of Amy Winehouse and Kurt Cobain dying young. Now, Cobain’s daughter is speaking out about it, understandably hitting a cord with the late-rock star’s offspring.

Yesterday evening, Cobain took to Twitter to give Del Rey a little advice about her supposed obsession with the glamour of dying young and her so-called desire to be dead already.

Most of Del Rey’s fans took the tweeting in stride, but like anything, there’s always one person that needs to be special and took offense to Cobain’s tweet about the songstress. Instead of going into a full Twitter war against the “offended” person, Cobain just explained (in 140 characters) how much of a talented artist Del Rey is, and that kind of talent should not be wasted like that.

Lana Del Rey Hits Back About Macabre Quote

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Before Lana Del Rey’s album Ultraviolence (finally) hit stores to her adoring fans, the songstress did an interview with The Guardian in which she said admitted she found the early deaths of Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse glamorous and said the disturbing quote, “I wish I was dead already.” For some, it didn’t exactly come off as a surprise that she would say something as dark as that because her last album was titled Born to Die, even though the truth is, we are born to die.

A week or so since that interview had been published, the “West Coast” singer has backtracked saying that it was taken out of context by the interviewer. Taking to her Twitter she calls out the writer by saying, “I regret trusting the guardian.”

She then followed it up by writing, “I didn’t want to do an interview but the journalist was persistent.”

Then, she went after the writer, Alexis Petridis saying that “[He was] masked as a fan but was hiding a sinister ambitions and angles. Maybe he’s actually the boring one looking for something interesting to write about,” she continued on her worded rampage.

“His leading questions about death and persona were calculated.”

But it turns out, that Petridis was not the author of the piece; rather, it as The Guardian’s music editor, Tim Jonze. Jonze went on to publish a lengthy piece about her words and even went to say that Del Rey was “delightful company” and defended his own words.

If you’re not convinced, Jonze went on to release the two-minute clip of the so-called “death” chat, but the transcript can be read below. Sadly, the audio has been taken down. We can only assume who was behind that.

Tim Jonze: This is quite a dark question to ask, but is there a fancy of dying young yourself you could subscribe to?

Lana Del Rey: Yeah, you know, I wish I was dead already.

TJ: Don’t say that.

LDR: But I do.

TJ: You don’t!

LDR: I do! I don’t want to have to keep doing this. But I am.